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Greece & Spain in EuroBasket 2013 (hosted in Slovenia, 4-22 September) [infographic]

3 September, 2013
Infographic with facts and figures about the EuroBasket 2013 (Spain & Greece)

Click on the image to enlarge it

The EuroBasket 2013 which is hosted in Slovenia is about to begin (4-22 September).

In this infographic we present a pie chart with the EuroBasket winners so far: Soviet Union (14 times), Yugoslavia (8 times), Lithuania (3 times). 2-time winners are Italy, Greece and Spain and there are 6 other teams which have won the title once.

Another pie chart shows a tendency for the host teams (it’s Slovenia in this EuroBasket) to win if not the trophy itself (9 times out of the 37 EuroBasket so far), at least the silver medal – 2nd place (8 times) or the bronze medal – 3rd place (2 times so far).

The trophy itself is a “a masterpiece of gold and sterling silver combined with jewels“. It is made of 24 jewels, gold, and sterling silver based on solid marble.

Another chart presents a timeline with the number of participating teams in each EuroBasket.

Spain and Greece are considered favourites of the tournament and the rest of the infographic deals with the two teams: their place in each EuroBasket (both teams have won the trophy twice), their roster (focusing on the height and the age of the players) and their schedule.

Greece is in Group D, together with Finland, Russia, Italy, Sweden and Turkey.

Spain is in Group C, together with Croatia, Georgia, Poland, Czech Republic and Slovenia.

Both teams play on 4, 5, 7, 8 & 9 of September their first-round matches and if they manage to finish in the first top three teams of their group they will proceed to the second round where they will play against each other.

Enjoy the show!

Sources:
FIBA Europe EuroBasket 2013

Credits:
Many thanks to Pavlos Kapralos for his invaluable feedback during the design process.

If you found this post interesting, why not have a look at other sports-related posts:
A history of the Basketball World Championships (Mundobasket) [1950-2006]
A History of the IAAF World Athletics Championships – infographic
Bigger, thicker, heavier: the evolution of the Olympic Games medals infographic
2012 London Olympic Games: Ticket Prices
World Cup 2010: Representation of the Continents
World Cup Finals 2010: the Group Stage – an infograph
The History of the Football World Cup Finals (1930-2006)

Brockwell 5K parkrun, Herne Hill #136 – 17 August 2013: The Report [infographic]

21 August, 2013

Infographic with bites of the facts, the glory and the gossip of Brockwell 5K parkrun, Herne Hill #136 - 17 August 2013

Click on the image to enlarge it

Here is an infographic which aims to inspire more people to participate in sports (running in particular) activities. It is a rather personal/local and informal infographic (it should be relevant directly to less than 200 people who have participated in the Brockwell parkrun on 17 August 2013). Still, as parkrun is already an international phenomenon many more people could find it interesting.

Parkrun is a 5km run, that takes place (as a rule of thumb) every Saturday morning at 9am in various parks. It is quite popular in England and specially London. There are also events throughout the United Kingdom, Ireland, Denmark, Poland, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa and the United States.

Unlike many other running events it is free to participate and it is supported by volunteers (e.g. marshals, time keepers, number checkers). And although it is a free event, the quality of the experience (running, meeting new people, publishing of the results and keeping track of progress) is of a very high standard. How many other events have their own infographic anyway? ;-)

The very fact that it takes place every Saturday and you can participate as often as you like makes it a very useful event to check your progress. And it is mostly “you against the clock”; it is more likely that you perceive the other participants as friends who inspire you to go faster and get the best out of yourself rather than regard them as competitors.

The infographic is the ‘report’ – yes, most often each local parkrun assigns a volunteer to write a report about each event – of a parkrun event that took place at Brockwell park (Brixton, London) on Saturday, 17 August 2013.

On the top there are the volunteers (with their names) of the parkrun in their high visibility vests. Just below them are the finishers: each line has and represents 20 finishers; there were 148 in total. They are sorted by gender and those who did a PB (personal best) are ‘highlighted’.

Next to the volunteers is a map of the Brockwell park where the route of the parkrun is described. On the right column a map of Great Britain shows the total distance covered by the participants. If it were a relay, starting from Brockwell Lido they would have gone beyond Dundee, Scotland (740km or 460 miles in total).

Below the map is some ‘stars’ of the parkrun. Two of them, Sue & Tim McIntyre,  were visitors with lots of experience on their legs (they have participated in more than 200 parkruns each!) while another one, Ryan Georgiades, completed his 50th parkrun. When parkrun runners reach the magic number 50 (total runs) they are presented with a very special red running T-shirt!

Finally, on the bottom of the infographic there is a timeline which shows when each runner finished. For comparison there are some records displayed as well as the recent (on the parkrun’s eve) Mo Farah’s time that earned him the 2013 World Championship gold medal in 5000m. By the way, the man himself has participated in a few parkrun events!

So why don’t you give it a go? It could be a life-changing experience that will make Saturday mornings very exciting indeed!

Sources:
Brockwell parkrun Brockwell parkrun, Herne Hill results pages
IAAF World Records: 5000 Metres – men – senior – outdoor

Credits:
The infographic was inspired by the witty writings of Robert Lloyd Smith. Read some of his text parkrun reports here.

If you found this post interesting, why not have a look at other sports-related posts:
parkrun is booming!
A History of the IAAF World Athletics Championships – infographic
Bigger, thicker, heavier: the evolution of the Olympic Games medals infographic
2012 London Olympic Games: Ticket Prices
A history of the Basketball World Championships (Mundobasket) [1950-2006]
World Cup 2010: Representation of the Continents
World Cup Finals 2010: the Group Stage – an infograph
The History of the Football World Cup Finals (1930-2006)

A History of the IAAF World Athletics Championships – infographic

9 August, 2013

An infographic presenting the IAAF World Athletics Championships  host cities/countries & number of participating countries/athletes

Click on the image to enlarge it

The 14th IAAF World Championships in athletics Moscow 2013 are about to begin (Saturday, 10 August 2013).

We present an infographic with the host cities/countries and the number of participating countries and athletes in each championships.

During the 1st Championships (Helsinki, 1983), 1,333 athletes from 153 countries participated while this time (Moscow, 2013) 1,967 athletes from 206 countries have been declared to participate.

On the map of the infographic the concentration of the orange ‘dots’ (host cities) in Europe is quite notable: 10 out of the 14 World Championships have taken place in Europe (including the Moscow Championships); only once in North America (Edmonton, Canada) and 3 in Asia (twice in Japan and once in Korea) – none in the rest of the continents (Africa, Australia, South America).

Enjoy the Championships!

Sources:
IAAF Moscow 2013 statistics book (PDF Document)

If you found this post interesting, why not have a look at other sports-related posts:
Bigger, thicker, heavier: the evolution of the Olympic Games medals infographic
2012 London Olympic Games: Ticket Prices
A history of the Basketball World Championships (Mundobasket) [1950-2006]
World Cup 2010: Representation of the Continents
World Cup Finals 2010: the Group Stage – an infograph
The History of the Football World Cup Finals (1930-2006)

The Beatles: Please Please Me Album (LP) 50th Release Anniversary – infographic

22 March, 2013
Click on the image to enlarge it

Click on the image to enlarge it

Today, it’s the 50th release anniversary of The Beatles first album (LP) Please Please Me.

SIDE A

SIDE B

On the infographic there are some facts about the songs of the Please Please Me album, their lyrics, the recordings and a timeline.

Sources:
Davies, H. (2009) The Beatles: The Authorised Biography, London: Ebury Press.
Trynka, P. (ed.) (2006) The Beatles: Ten years that shook the world, London: Dorling Kindersley.
Turner, S. (2012) A hard day’s write: the stories behind every Beatles’ song, London: Carlton Books.
The Official UK Charts Company Website: Please Please Me
Billboard Website: Week of March 14, 1964

If you found this post interesting, why not have a look at other related to music infographics:
The Beatles: Please Please Me single (50th Release Anniversary) – infographic
The Beatles: Love Me Do single (50th Release Anniversary) – infographic
50 years without George Formby (died on 6 March 1961)

The Beatles: Please Please Me single (50th Release Anniversary) – infographic

11 January, 2013
An infographic presenting facts about "Please Please Me", the second single of The Beatles

Click on the image to enlarge it

About two months ago we published an infographic about the 50th release anniversary of the first single of the Beatles, Love Me Do.

Today, it’s the 50th release anniversary of their second single, Please Please Me (with Ask Me Why on the flip side).

Some things the two singles (Love Me Do & Please Please Me) have in common include:

  • all four songs are Lennon-McCartney compositions
  • on the song of the A Side of each single the harmonica is present
  • both have love songs, all of the songs include the word “love” and “you” in their lyrics

And some things that are different include:

  • Love Me Do (single) has songs mainly composed by Paul McCartney; Please Please Me (single) songs have Lennon as the main contributor
  • while both Love Me Do / P.S. I love you include the word “love” in their titles there is no “love” word in the titles of Please Please Me / Ask Me Why

On the infographic there are some facts about the songs of the Please Please Me single, the recording, the musical instruments and the people involved.

Please Please Me was mainly written by John Lennon. The Beatles performed it to George Martin during the second recording session of Love Me Do (11 September 1962) for him to consider it as a song for their first single but at the time George Martin was not enthusiastic about it.

After some alterations George Martin accepted it and the Beatles recorded it (18 takes) together with Ask Me Why (6 takes) on 26 November 1962. The single entered the (UK) Record Retailer charts (TOP 100). It stayed on the charts for 18 weeks reaching No 2 at its hay day. It reached No 1 on other publications (NME, Melody Maker and Disc).

Twenty years after its release it entered the UK charts again (22 January  1983) and stayed there for 4 weeks reaching No 29 at its peak.

In the US the single was first released about a month after its UK release; it failed to enter the charts. However, on 3 January 1964 it was re-released with From Me To You on the flip side and it reached No 3 on the Billboard Hot 100 about two months later.

Sources:
Davies, H. (2009) The Beatles: The Authorised Biography, London: Ebury Press.
Trynka, P. (ed.) (2006) The Beatles: Ten years that shook the world, London: Dorling Kindersley.
Turner, S. (2010) A hard day’s write: the stories behind every Beatles’ song, London: Carlton Books.
The Official UK Charts Company Website: Please Please Me
Billboard Website: Week of March 14, 1964

Credits:
The lyrics ‘cloud’ was partially designed with Wordle

If you found this post interesting, why not have a look at other related to music infographics:
The Beatles: Love Me Do single (50th Release Anniversary) – infographic
50 years without George Formby (died on 6 March 1961)
The Real Group Discography: a timeline

New Year, New Fares (2003 – 2013) [infographic] The evolution of the London tube & bus fares in the last decade

2 January, 2013
Infographic presenting the evolution of the London tube & bus fares in the last decade

Click on the image to enlarge it

It looks like every new year and most often on the 2nd of January, the public transport fares in London are updated (a mild way to say “increase”).

The above infographic presents the evolution of the prices of single bus fares, one-day bus passes (or Oyster daily price cap nowadays) and one-day travelcards for London Underground (tube) zones 1 & 2 in the last decade (2003-2013).

Paying with cash, the single bus fare has gone up at least 240% (2.4 times) compared to its price ten years ago. Back in 2003 a single bus fare in central London cost £1.00 (£0.70 for outer zones). Starting today (2 January 2013) the single bus flat fare (paying by cash) costs £2.40.

However, using an Oyster card a single bus trip costs now £1.40 which is an 140% (1.4 times) increase compared to Spring 2004 prices when Oyster was introduced on buses.

Sources:
Various ephemera (tickets)
Fares and tickets guides London: Transport for London (various publications)
GLA Website
TfL Website
BBC Website

Credits:
Many thanks to Kalliopi Vgontza for her technical expertise and Marina Vellou, Christos Makropoulos and Pavlos Kapralos for their feedback and suggestions.

If you found this post interesting, why not have a look at other related to transportation infographics:
Traffic information (Terminal Passengers) for UK airports (November 2010)
Airlines’ load factor – February 2010

U.S. Presidential Election 2012: Who would win by TV ads? [infographic]

26 October, 2012
An infographic presenting data about U.S. Presidential Election TV ads and Super PACs

Click on the image to enlarge it

U.S. Presidential Election 2012 is getting closer its big day and the developers of Super PAC App have shared with us their data and their idea to create an infographic about the election.

Super PAC App is an iphone app with which, “while watching a political TV ad, a user can hold up her phone to identify the commercial and receive objective, third-party information. Super PAC App allows the user to rate the ad, while understanding who and how much money is behind the ad, what claims the ad is making, and whether those claims are based on facts.

Using the data the users of Super PAC App have produced we have created two U.S. maps: the top one illustrates the reaction of the users to official campaign ads while the next one shows their reaction to ads funded by outside groups including super PACs. Super PACs are outside groups that can raise and spend unlimited funds on political races. To date, they’ve spent over $546 million.

A few words about the methodology that has been used for the data analysis:

  • States are given a score as to how positively they rated Romney and Obama ads. Scores are normalized to account for differences in number of ratings per state
  • States are ranked 1 (most positive) through 45 (least positive) relative to each other based on these scores (for the 44 states and D.C. for which we have data)
  • State rankings are compared to determine whether the state is deep red, deep blue, or in the middle. For example, on the Outside Group ads map, North Carolina is deep red. It has the 2nd most positive rating for Romney ads and 39th most positive rating for Obama ads, making it one of the most pro-Romney states. Maryland ranks 16th for both Romney and Obama ads, making it neutral ground.

Data collected from Sept. 24 through Oct. 23. The size of the sample is 3,492 users (not statistically significant).

If you want to know who is behind that TV ad you watch, and take part into rating the ads why don’t you try the app yourself? Download Super PAC App in the App Store. It’s free!

At the bottom of the infographic there is a section dedicated to Super PACs (super political action committees or “independent-expenditure only committees”). According to www.opensecrets.org, on Oct. 22 there were 946 Super PACs. 56% (531 of 946) of them were inactive (had neither raised nor spent any money).

We have excluded from the wordle with the names of the super PACs all the inactive ones (among which there were examples like “My Cat Xavier for a Better Tomorrow, Tomorrow”, “Zombies of Tomorrow” and 52 “Horse Assn” (associations)).

The word “America” is the most used one (46 times), followed by the word “Fund” (33 times), “Action” (29 times),  “American” (23 times) and “Freedom” (19 times).

Sources:
Super PAC App www.superpacapp.org
2012 Outside Spending, by Super PACs www.opensecrets.org

Credits:
The “Super PACs: What’s in a name?” graphic was designed with Wordle

If you found this infographic interesting, why not have a look at other infographics we have created? Click here for more
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