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Seating capacity decreases as spectators become bigger [infographic]

17 November, 2014
Infographic showing the Malvern Cinema seating capacity before and after refurbishment

Click on the image to enlarge it

A week ago (Monday, 10 November 2014) in the Telegraph’s printed edition (page 9) there was a text-only article about the refurbishment of Malvern cinema in Worcestershire (UK). Inspired by its content and after further research we present it here as an infographic with additional content from other sources.

Malvern Cinema opened in 1923 (Malvin Picture House). By 1964 the cinema was closed and a year later it was “extensively refurbished”.

Earlier this November it was refurbished again and its old 17-inch-wide seats were replaced for 21-inch-wide ones. As a result the cinema’s seating capacity was reduced from 384 seats to 303; that’s more than a 20% reduction. The cinema re-opened on Thursday, 13 November 2014.

The new seats come in three types: standard (16 seats for each stalls’ row), premium (15 seats for each row) and double. All of the seats now have cup holders.

The new seating cost £50,000 raised exclusively from donations. The old seats were sold out for £30 per pair in 24 hours after going on sale.

One of the main reasons of the new seating was comfort. The old seats were too narrow for present-day spectators. Public Health England estimates that in England, in 2012, two in three men were either overweight or obese. Obesity in adults rose from 15% in 1993 to 25% in 2012.

Sources:
Malvern Theatres Website History
Malvern Theatres Facebook Page
Daily Mail Online Worcestershire’s Malvern Cinema to replace seats because of our expanding bottoms
The Daily Telegraph, Print Edition, 10 November 2014, p.9 “Big bottoms force cinema to change seats”
Malvern Gazette Ninety one-year-old venue will be sitting pretty after refurbishment
Public Health England Weight & Obesity data factsheets

If you found this post interesting, why not have a look at our posts about:
Alcohol-related deaths in England
We Are What We Eat: an infographic
The Food Cube (as the new Food Pyramid)

10 years of parkrun: the story so far [infographic]

3 October, 2014
Infographic showing parkrun’s achievements during its first decade

Click on the image to enlarge it

Parkrun, a free, 5km run, that takes place every Saturday morning in various parks and other locations, celebrates its 10th anniversary and we publish an infographic showing its story and achievements so far.

There are now 10 countries (UK, Australia, South Africa, Ireland, Poland, Denmark, New Zealand, USA, Russia and Singapore) where parkrun events take place, 477 different locations and 765,534 runners who have completed at least one parkrun.

It all started 10 years ago, on 2 October 2004 in Bushy Park, London, UK, with 13 runners and 4 volunteers. Now London alone, the city where parkrun is most popular, 44 events are accommodated every Saturday. Last Saturday (27 September 2014) 53,063 runners completed a parkrun in the UK while 4,781 volunteers (e.g. marshals, time keepers, number checkers) made all those events possible to happen.

In the infographic we present a timeline with bits of parkrun’s story (1st event in each country with date, location and number of participants). There is also a graphic comparing the total number of locations by country and the total number of runners per country.

Parkrun is not a once-in-a-life experience! Many parkrunners are persistent and do it almost every week: 20,984 of them have completed at least 50 parkruns so far and 5,030 of them have between 100 and 249 runs. There are 139 runners who have completed more than 250 events: that’s about participating every single Saturday for 5 consecutive years!

We wish parkrun many happy returns and we look forward to experiencing all the new achievements that it will accomplish in the next ten years!

Sources:
parkrun Our Story

If you found this post interesting, why not have a look at other sports-related posts:
Brockwell 5K parkrun, Herne Hill #136 – 17 August 2013: The Report [infographic]
parkrun is booming!
A History of the IAAF World Athletics Championships – infographic
Bigger, thicker, heavier: the evolution of the Olympic Games medals infographic
2014 FIBA Basketball World Cup: The height of the players (tallest & shortest: player, team, position) infographic
2014 FIFA World Cup™: The Players series – II. Their height (tallest & shortest: player, team, position) infographic
2014 FIFA World Cup™: The Players series – I. Where their club is based (home/abroad & top countries) infographic
2012 London Olympic Games: Ticket Prices
A history of the Basketball World Championships (Mundobasket) [1950-2006]
World Cup 2010: Representation of the Continents
World Cup Finals 2010: the Group Stage – an infograph
The History of the Football World Cup Finals (1930-2006)

2014 FIBA Basketball World Cup: The height of the players (tallest & shortest: player, team, position) infographic

2 September, 2014
Infographic with facts and figures about the heights of the players of the 2014 FIBA World Cup

Click on the image to enlarge it

Today’s infographic examines the height of the basketball players who participate in the 2014 FIBA Basketball Word Cup held in Spain (30 August – 14 September).

The shortest basketball player of the tournament is Philippine point guard Lewis Alfred ‘LA’ Tenorio standing at 1.70m (5’6”). There are 3 more participants below 1.80m (5’9”): one of them is Iranian point guard Sajjad Mashayekhi (1.78 m – 5’8”) and the other two play in the Philippines team. In fact the Philippines team has the lowest height average, 1.91m (6’3”) and point guards are the shortest in the tournament – average at 1.88m (6’2”) and usually is the position where shorter players thrive.

On the other end of the spectrum tallest team is Greece – average 2.04m (6’7”), followed close by Serbia. Centers are the tallest players – average at 2.10m (6’9”). The tallest participant of the 2014 FIBA World Cup is Iranian centre Hamed Haddadi standing at 2.18m (7’2”).

For comparison on the infographic the players stand by a backstop unit. The official distance from the basket ring to the ground is 3.05m (10’0”).

The (mean) average height of all the participants is 1.99m (6’5”).

It could be interesting to compare (link opens to a new window) the height of the participants of the FIBA basketball World Cup to the height of the participants of the equivalent 2014 FIFA World Cup (football). The average height of the 2014 Brazil World Cup footballers was 1.82m (5’11”).

Here is a table with the heights of each position and team (average) participating in the 2014 FIBA Basketball World Cup:

Height of:
(cm)
(ft)
Hamed Haddadi (Iran – center) 218.0 7’2”
Centers (average) 209.9 6’9”
Power Forwards (average) 204.9 6’7”
Greece 204.0 6’7”
Serbia 203.9 6’7”
Croatia 202.7 6’6”
Lithuania 202.3 6’6”
All forwards (average) 202.2 6’6”
Senegal 201.6 6’6”
Australia 201.4 6’6”
France 200.9 6’6”
Turkey 200.8 6’6”
USA 200.8 6’6”
Brazil 200.1 6’6”
Ukraine 200.1 6’6”
Slovenia 199.8 6’6”
Spain 199.8 6’6”
Small Forwards (average) 199.4 6’5”
All Players (average) 199.1 6’5”
Finland 198.6 6’5”
Argentina 198.4 6’5”
Puerto Rico 198.3 6’5”
Iran 198.3 6’5”
Mexico 197.0 6’5”
Egypt 196.4 6’4”
Angola 196.1 6’4”
New Zealand 195.9 6’4”
Dominican Republic 194.8 6’4”
Korea 194.3 6’4”
Shooting Guards (average) 193.7 6’4”
Philippines 191.3 6’3”
All guards (average) 190.3 6’2”
Point Guards (average) 187.8 6’2”
Lewis Alfred ‘LA’ Tenorio (Philippines – Guard) 170.0 5’6”

Sources:
FIBA The Official Website of the 2014 FIBA Basketball World Cup

If you found this post interesting, why not have a look at other of our posts/infographics related to sports:
A history of the Basketball World Championships (Mundobasket) [1950-2006]
The History of the Football World Cup Finals (1930-2006) infographic
2014 FIFA World Cup™: The Players series – I. Where their club is based (home/abroad & top countries) infographic
Bigger, thicker, heavier: the evolution of the Olympic Games medals infographic

 

2014 FIFA World Cup™: The Vicious Circle of Penalty Shootouts [infographic]

12 July, 2014
Infographic presenting how teams proceed when they play consecutive penalty shootouts

Click on the image to enlarge it

Here is an interesting pattern / sequence we have noticed at the knockout stage of the 2014 World Cup:

  • During the ‘Round of 16′ Costa Rica beats Greece in penalty shootout 5 – 3 (Full-time Score: 1-1)
  • Costa Rica plays against Netherlands on the next round (quarter-finals); the game ends with a penalty shootout in which Costa Rica looses 4-3 (Full-time score: 0-0)
  • Netherlands then plays against Argentina (semi-finals) and looses 4-2 (Full-time score: 0-0)

If the pattern continues Argentina will be in trouble if the final match against Germany ends in a penalty shootout.

Is it because the opposition have the opportunity to study the way the team, which has advanced to the current stage from a penalty shootout match, handles the penalties (the goalkeeper and the players who take them)? Or is it something random? If the final (Germany vs Argentina) ends in a penalty shootout we will have the opportunity to get a better idea.

Sources:
BBC World Cup 2014 | Groups & Schedule | Knockout Stage

If you found this post interesting, why not have a look at our posts about:
2014 FIFA World Cup™: The Players series – II. Their height (tallest & shortest: player, team, position) infographic
2014 FIFA World Cup™: The Players series – I. Where their club is based (home/abroad & top countries) infographic
The History of the Football World Cup Finals (1930-2006) infographic
World Cup Finals 2010: the Group Stage – an infograph
World Cup 2010: Representation of the Continents (infographic)

 

2014 FIFA World Cup™: The Players series – II. Their height (tallest & shortest: player, team, position) infographic

24 June, 2014
Infographic with facts and figures about the players of the 2014 FIFA World Cup™

Click on the image to enlarge it

This is the second infographic of a series related to the players of the 2014 World Cup. It examines the height of the footballers.

Tallest man of the tournament is England’s goalkeeper Fraser Forster with a height of 2.01 metres (6’7”). The shortest goalkeepers have a height of 1.78m (5’10”) and there are five of them: Cameroon’s Loic Feudjou & Sammy Ndjock, Costa Rica’s Patrick Pemberton, Honduras’s Noel Valladares and Mexico’s Jose Corona. On average goalkeepers are taller than the rest of the players (1.88m).

They are followed by defenders (1.83m) and forwards (1.80m). Shortest position is the midfielders (1.79m). The shortest two men of this World Cup are Cameroon’s midfielder Edgar Salli and Italy’s forward Lorenzo Insigne (both 1.63m – 5’4”)*.

Tallest team on average is Germany (1.85m) followed by Bosnia & Herzegovina and Greece. Shortest team is Chile (1.76m) followed by Japan and Mexico (1.78m).

For comparison on the infographic the players stand by a goalpost. The official distance from the lower edge of the crossbar to the ground is 2.44m (8ft).

Here is a table with the heights of each team (average) participating in the World Cup:

Height of:
(cm)
(ft)
Fraser Forster (England – goalkeeper) 201.0 6’7”
Goalkeepers (average) 187.7 6’2”
Germany 185.3 6’2”
Bosnia and Herzegovina 185.0 6’2”
Greece 184.7 6’2”
Belgium 184.5 6’2”
Croatia 184.4 6’2”
Korea Republic (South Korea) 183.9 6’0”
England 183.3 6’0”
Iran 183.1 6’0”
USA 183.0 6’0”
Defenders (average) 183.0 6’0”
Switzerland 182.8 6’0”
Italy 182.4 6’0′
Algeria 182.2 6’0”
Brazil 182.0 6’0”
Nigeria 182.0 6’0”
Netherlands 181.9 6’0”
Russia 181.9 6’0”
Portugal 181.8 6’0”
Colombia 181.7 6’0”
All Players (average) 181.6 5’11”
France 181.3 5’11”
Uruguay 181.2 5’11”
Argentina 181.1 5’11”
Côte d’Ivoire (Ivory Coast) 180.8 5’11”
Australia 180.3 5’11”
Costa Rica 180.3 5’11”
Forwards (average) 180.2 5’11”
Spain 179.8 5’11”
Honduras 179.6 5’11”
Cameroon 179.4 5’11”
Ghana 179.4 5’11”
Ecuador 179.3 5’11”
Midfielders (average) 178.7 5’10”
Japan 178.0 5’10”
Mexico 178.0 5’10”
Chile 176.0 5’9”
Edgar Salli (Cameroon – Midfielder)
Lorenzo Insigne (Italy – Forward)
163.0 5’4”

 

Sources:
FIFA The Official Website of the FIFA World Cup™

If you found this post interesting, why not have a look at our posts about:
2014 FIFA World Cup™: The Players series – I. Where their club is based (home/abroad & top countries) infographic
The History of the Football World Cup Finals (1930-2006) infographic
World Cup Finals 2010: the Group Stage – an infograph
World Cup 2010: Representation of the Continents (infographic)

 

* In previous versions of the infographic (1.0-1.0.1 – 24 June 2014) & post, it was stated that the shortest man of the tournament was Marvin Chavez (Honduras – Midfielder) with a height of 1.56m; this was most likely because of a typo at FIFA’s database/website. After cross-referencing with other sources (e.g. The Guardian) it looks as if Marvin Chavez is not 1.56m high but 1.65m instead.

2014 FIFA World Cup™: The Players series – I. Where their club is based (home/abroad & top countries) infographic

13 June, 2014
Infographic with facts and figures about the players of the 2014 FIFA World Cup™

Click on the image to enlarge it

The 2014 FIFA World Cup™ has just started and we present a series of infographics related to the 736 footballers of the 32 national World Cup teams.

The first one, published today, examines where the players club is based (in or away from the nation they represent).

From the graphs on the top we see that there is a tendency in the top-class World Cup participants to play for a club that is away from their own country.

On average from the 23 players who make each national team only 8 (8.1 to be precise) play in home clubs; in other words about 2 out of every 3 participants (477 players out of the 736 in total) play in a club abroad.

Leaders of this kind of ‘immigration’ are Bosnia and Herzegovina, Ghana, Ivory Coast and Uruguay which have only one footballer playing in a club belonging to their national leagues. Ghana has members playing in clubs in 3 different continents (Europe, Asia, Africa) and 13 different countries: France (5 players), Italy (5), Russia (2), South Africa (2), Belgium (1), England (1), Germany (1), Greece (1), Netherlands (1), Norway (1), Tunisia (1) United Arab Emirates (1) and home Ghana (1)!

At the other end of the spectrum is Russia, the only national team participating in the World Cup 2014 with all its members playing in clubs based in their own country. The English squad has only one member playing in a non-domestic club: it’s goalkeeper Fraser Foster who plays in Celtic FC, in the nearby Scotland.

It does make sense as the English leagues (mainly the Premier League) are the most attractive among the World Cup participants: 120, almost one in six, play there. Other dominant leagues are the Italian (82 representatives), the German (77), the Spanish (64) and the French (45).

On the next graphic (the one with the coloured disks) some interesting trends can be found. E.g. almost half (11/23) of the Belgian team play in English leagues; it’s quite similar for the French: (10/23). The Swiss prefer the German league (9 out of 23 play for clubs in Germany).

FC Bayern Munich (Germany) and Manchester United FC (England) are the most dominant clubs in Brazil’s World Cup with 14 representatives each; however, it’s not only the Premier League (in England) that attracts international footballers: 11 of them play in the Football League Championship (2nd highest division) and two (Australia’s Bailey Wright and Massimo Luongo) in League One (3rd highest division).

In total, more than ¾ of the World Cup footballers play in a European club (that’s 76% of the total or 560 out of 736 footballers). This is not exactly a wonder considering that 13 out of the 32 participating nations are European.

There is a similar article on FIFA’s website titled “The squads in numbers“; any differences in figures are perhaps because of the following:

  • in our data we have taken into account most of the last-minute changes of the composition of the squads (due to injuries) up to the kicking-off day (12 June)
  • we have included players of Welsh clubs (Cardiff City FC, Swansea City AFC) in England (as their teams participate in the English Premier League)
  • if a player has played in the season that just ended (2013-2014) on loan from his ‘mother’ team, we count as his team the one he actually played with (not the one he ‘belongs’ to)

Well, enjoy the World Cup and visit this blog soon as we plan to publish more infographics on this series!

Sources:
FIFA The Official Website of the FIFA World Cup™
BBC BBC – 2014 Fifa World Cup (Teams)

Credits:
Many thanks to Adela Pickles (LinkedIn page) and Shena Aitkenhead for their suggestions and feedback.

If you found this post interesting, why not have a look at our posts about:
The History of the Football World Cup Finals (1930-2006) infographic
World Cup Finals 2010: the Group Stage – an infograph
World Cup 2010: Representation of the Continents (infographic)

Tomatoes in the UK (infographic)

19 May, 2014
Infographic with facts and figures about tomatoes in the UK

Click on the image to enlarge it

Today is the first day of the British tomato week (19-25 May 2014) and we publish a related research and infographic.

We examine history, nutrition, imports, production and waste of tomatoes in the UK.

First things first; many people perhaps associate tomatoes with the Mediterranean diet, Italy, Spain or Greece but the fact is that tomatoes were not known in Europe until the 16th century. They originate from the Andes (South America). In the UK they were first commercially cultivated in the 19th century (Kent and Essex).

Tomatoes consist mainly of water (that’s why it takes so much water to grow them): a 100g standard/classic tomato has 94.6g of water. It also consists of carbohydrates (3g), protein (0.5g) and fat (0.1g). Cherry tomatoes have less water (91.4g) and more carbohydrates (3.6g; that’s why they taste sweeter), protein (1.1g) and fat (0.5g).

Production wise (2012 data), China is the leader with about one third (1/3) of the world’s production being grown there; that’s about 50,000 thousand tonnes. India follows with 17,500 thousand and USA comes third (13,207 thousand). Turkey, Egypt, Iran, Italy, Spain, Brazil and Mexico complete the top 10. UK ranks 79th with 84 thousand tonnes. This is not enough to cover the demand (it’s actually less than 20% of the total supply) so the UK imports more than 400 thousand tonnes of tomatoes per year.

Top origin country of the imported tomatoes is the Netherlands (more than a third of the total imports), followed by Spain (about a third) and Morocco. During our field research at supermarkets/grocers in London (February – May 2014) we also found tomatoes produced in Senegal (baby plum tomatoes), Italy, Portugal, Poland and Israel.

Packaging of tomatoes

In many cases, the name of the grower is present on the packaging of tomatoes

Generally speaking most FMCG producers remain anonymous or they are known by their brand names. In that respect it is worth mentioning that in many cases we found on the packaging of tomatoes not only the country of produce but the name of the grower too. And we are talking about real people with a passion for growing tomatoes. Examples, from the UK growers, include:
Brian Moralee (Isle of Wight), Andy Roe (Lancashire), R. Lewis (Cambridgeshire), N. Bartle (Tees Valley), Chris Wall (Sussex), R. Holt (Worcestershire), P. Robinson (Cheshire), Peter Bell (Essex) and Mike Flux (Kent).

On the infographic there is a UK map with some of the British tomato growers. It shows their geographical location and the area (in hectares) they grow tomatoes on.

A report by Waste & Resources Action Programme (WRAP) published in November 2013 estimated the amount of tomato waste in the UK to 49 thousand tonnes a year (for 2012). That’s more than 10% of the total supply (more than 1 out of 10 tomatoes ended up in the bin). Though significantly reduced from 2007 equivalent waste, the 2012 tomato waste was greater than half the amount of the UK production in the same year.

Sources:
Tomato Growers’ Association Facts
GOV.UK – Department of Health Nutrient Analysis of Fruit and Vegetables
FAO FAOSTAT Gateway
HM Revenue & Customs Statistics
GOV.UK – Department for Environment, Food & Rural Affairs Basic Horticultural Statistics 2013
WRAP UK Household food and drink waste in the UK 2012
Eric Wall Ltd Welcome to Eric Wall Ltd
Robinson’s Nurseries Robinson’s Nurseries Website – Tomatoes
Tanfield Food Company Ltd Look What We Found website: Our Farmers – Nigel Bartle
Glinwell PLC Glinwell PLC Website | Our Nurseries
APS Salads APS Salads Website – Home page
HorticultureWeek.co.uk APS Salads augments southern supplies with purchase of second nursery in Kent (26 Aug 2011)
Guy and Wright Guy and Wright Website – Map
British Sugar PLC Products and Services
Thanet Earth Thanet Earth Website – About Us
Wight Salads Group Facts & Figures

If you found this post interesting, why not have a look at our posts about:
We Are What We Eat: an infographic
Potatoes in the UK
Carrots in the UK
Know your onions: an infograph
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