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Paintings as infographics: Sunflowers by Vincent van Gogh

29 June, 2015
Paintings as Infographics: Sunflowers by Vincent van Gogh

Click on the image to enlarge it

[Updated and enriched on 28 July 2015]

On 29 July 2015 it is 125 years since the death of painter Vincent van Gogh (1853-1890). His life and art is being celebrated on this occasion by many museums and organisations in Europe and we present an infographic about Sunflowers, one of his most popular paintings.

In August 1888, two years before his death, Van Gogh painted a series of paintings of sunflowers in Arles, France, including the one that hangs in the National Gallery, London (Room 45).

It’s a still life with a vase (in fact a pot) that holds about 15 sunflowers.

At the top of the infographic there is a geometric-style interpretation of the painting followed by a more ‘infographic’ approach: “The Image Decomposed” shows the simple means Van Gogh used for his painting and, specially in the case of the wall and the table, his subtle, abstract approach.

A map with important locations related to the painting includes Arles, France (the town where Van Gogh painted the Sunflowers series, London, UK (the location of the National Gallery which acquired the original painting in 1924), Amsterdam, Netherlands (where a signed copy of the painting hangs in Van Gogh Museum) and Tokyo, Japan where the unsigned copy of the painting is situated.

Finally the original (August 1888) Sunflowers of the National Gallery, London is compared to the copy signed by Vincent  (January 1889) in the Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam and his unsigned copy (in the Seiji Togo Memorial Sompo Japan Nipponkoa Museum of Art, Tokyo):

  • the Amsterdam version is about 3cm taller than the London one (Van Gogh added a strip of wood to a canvas of the same dimensions as the London version). The Tokyo version is even taller (about 8cm taller than the London one) and wider by 3.5cm than the other two
  • on the London painting the signature of Van Gogh is on the the upper/glazed part of the vase; just above the line separating the glazed from the unglazed part; in French ultramarine
  • on the Amsterdam one his signature is on the lower/unglazed part of the vase; just below the line separating the glazed from the unglazed part; in a mix of Prussian blue and white
  • the Tokyo version is unsigned
  • comparing the London and the Amsterdam paintings side by side it can be noted that the angle of the line separating the table from the wall on the Amsterdam version is slightly steeper than on the London painting; furthermore it is in red while the London one is in blue; on the Tokyo one it is green

There are several occasions that the London and the Amsterdam have been displayed side by side, most recently at the National Gallery, London (25 January – 27 April 2014).

Although Van Gogh was commercially unsuccessful and managed to sell only one painting during his lifetime, the value of each of the Sunflowers paintings (in London,  Amsterdam and Tokyo) is estimated nowadays at £100m (one hundred million pounds)!


Credits
Many thanks to Maria Tsirodimitri for her creative input during the design process of the infographic.

Sources:
The National Gallery, London Vincent van Gogh | Sunflowers | NG3863
Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam Sunflowers
Seiji Togo Memorial Sompo Japan Nipponkoa Museum of Art, Tokyo Van Gogh (Sunflowers)
Bailey, M. (2013) The sunflowers are mine: The Story of Van Gogh’s Masterpiece. London: Frances Lincoln. Amazon.co.uk
Gayford, M. (2007) The yellow house: Van Gogh, Gauguin, and Nine Turbulent Weeks in Arles. London: Viking. Amazon.co.uk
BBC Archive Van Gogh – Canvas | 7: Sunflowers

If you found this post interesting, why not have a look at our other art-related posts:
Infographic: The anatomy of an auction
The Courtauld Gallery, London, Room 3: infographics

How well do Britons know their calories? [infographic]

7 January, 2015
Infographic showing facts and figures about Britons’ awareness of calorie issues

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This infographic presents findings of a research related to Britons’ awareness of calorie issues. The research was commissioned by Diabetes UK, The British Heart Foundation and Tesco and conducted by YouGov.

Some of the findings of the research include:

  • Almost two-thirds of Britons do not know how many calories the average person needs to maintain a healthy weight
  • One-third of the respondents underestimated the calorie content of semi skimmed milk
  • 39% underestimated the calorie content of a meal of chicken tikka masala with rice, one of the most popular UK dishes
  • 49% exercise less than the minimum recommended amount per week (2.5 hours)

With 62% of the British people being overweight, Diabetes UK, The British Heart Foundation and Tesco have joined forces and aim to raise in the next 3 years, £30 million and support 20 million people to eat healthily and exercise more.

One of the first activities of the partnership is 40,000 free health checks at Tesco stores this January. For more details visit http://www.tescocharitypartnership.org.uk

If you want to become more aware of issues related to calories and nutrition why don’t you try a free online course offered by Wageningen University, starting this Monday, 12 January 2015!

Sources:
DNA Two-thirds unaware of calories needed to maintain a healthy weight

If you found this post interesting, why not have a look at our posts about:
We Are What We Eat: an infographic
The Food Cube (as the new Food Pyramid)

Seating capacity decreases as spectators become bigger [infographic]

Seating capacity decreases as spectators become bigger [infographic]

17 November, 2014
Infographic showing the Malvern Cinema seating capacity before and after refurbishment

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A week ago (Monday, 10 November 2014) in the Telegraph’s printed edition (page 9) there was a text-only article about the refurbishment of Malvern cinema in Worcestershire (UK). Inspired by its content and after further research we present it here as an infographic with additional content from other sources.

Malvern Cinema opened in 1923 (Malvin Picture House). By 1964 the cinema was closed and a year later it was “extensively refurbished”.

Earlier this November it was refurbished again and its old 17-inch-wide seats were replaced for 21-inch-wide ones. As a result the cinema’s seating capacity was reduced from 384 seats to 303; that’s more than a 20% reduction. The cinema re-opened on Thursday, 13 November 2014.

The new seats come in three types: standard (16 seats for each stalls’ row), premium (15 seats for each row) and double. All of the seats now have cup holders.

The new seating cost £50,000 raised exclusively from donations. The old seats were sold out for £30 per pair in 24 hours after going on sale.

One of the main reasons of the new seating was comfort. The old seats were too narrow for present-day spectators. Public Health England estimates that in England, in 2012, two in three men were either overweight or obese. Obesity in adults rose from 15% in 1993 to 25% in 2012.

Sources:
Malvern Theatres Website History
Malvern Theatres Facebook Page
Daily Mail Online Worcestershire’s Malvern Cinema to replace seats because of our expanding bottoms
The Daily Telegraph, Print Edition, 10 November 2014, p.9 “Big bottoms force cinema to change seats”
Malvern Gazette Ninety one-year-old venue will be sitting pretty after refurbishment
Public Health England Weight & Obesity data factsheets

If you found this post interesting, why not have a look at our posts about:
Alcohol-related deaths in England
We Are What We Eat: an infographic
The Food Cube (as the new Food Pyramid)

10 years of parkrun: the story so far [infographic]

3 October, 2014
Infographic showing parkrun’s achievements during its first decade

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Parkrun, a free, 5km run, that takes place every Saturday morning in various parks and other locations, celebrates its 10th anniversary and we publish an infographic showing its story and achievements so far.

There are now 10 countries (UK, Australia, South Africa, Ireland, Poland, Denmark, New Zealand, USA, Russia and Singapore) where parkrun events take place, 477 different locations and 765,534 runners who have completed at least one parkrun.

It all started 10 years ago, on 2 October 2004 in Bushy Park, London, UK, with 13 runners and 4 volunteers. Now London alone, the city where parkrun is most popular, 44 events are accommodated every Saturday. Last Saturday (27 September 2014) 53,063 runners completed a parkrun in the UK while 4,781 volunteers (e.g. marshals, time keepers, number checkers) made all those events possible to happen.

In the infographic we present a timeline with bits of parkrun’s story (1st event in each country with date, location and number of participants). There is also a graphic comparing the total number of locations by country and the total number of runners per country.

Parkrun is not a once-in-a-life experience! Many parkrunners are persistent and do it almost every week: 20,984 of them have completed at least 50 parkruns so far and 5,030 of them have between 100 and 249 runs. There are 139 runners who have completed more than 250 events: that’s about participating every single Saturday for 5 consecutive years!

We wish parkrun many happy returns and we look forward to experiencing all the new achievements that it will accomplish in the next ten years!

Sources:
parkrun Our Story

If you found this post interesting, why not have a look at other sports-related posts:
Brockwell 5K parkrun, Herne Hill #136 – 17 August 2013: The Report [infographic]
parkrun is booming!
A History of the IAAF World Athletics Championships – infographic
Bigger, thicker, heavier: the evolution of the Olympic Games medals infographic
2014 FIBA Basketball World Cup: The height of the players (tallest & shortest: player, team, position) infographic
2014 FIFA World Cup™: The Players series – II. Their height (tallest & shortest: player, team, position) infographic
2014 FIFA World Cup™: The Players series – I. Where their club is based (home/abroad & top countries) infographic
2012 London Olympic Games: Ticket Prices
A history of the Basketball World Championships (Mundobasket) [1950-2006]
World Cup 2010: Representation of the Continents
World Cup Finals 2010: the Group Stage – an infograph
The History of the Football World Cup Finals (1930-2006)

2014 FIBA Basketball World Cup: The height of the players (tallest & shortest: player, team, position) infographic

2 September, 2014
Infographic with facts and figures about the heights of the players of the 2014 FIBA World Cup

Click on the image to enlarge it

Today’s infographic examines the height of the basketball players who participate in the 2014 FIBA Basketball Word Cup held in Spain (30 August – 14 September).

The shortest basketball player of the tournament is Philippine point guard Lewis Alfred ‘LA’ Tenorio standing at 1.70m (5’6”). There are 3 more participants below 1.80m (5’9”): one of them is Iranian point guard Sajjad Mashayekhi (1.78 m – 5’8”) and the other two play in the Philippines team. In fact the Philippines team has the lowest height average, 1.91m (6’3”) and point guards are the shortest in the tournament – average at 1.88m (6’2”) and usually is the position where shorter players thrive.

On the other end of the spectrum tallest team is Greece – average 2.04m (6’7”), followed close by Serbia. Centers are the tallest players – average at 2.10m (6’9”). The tallest participant of the 2014 FIBA World Cup is Iranian centre Hamed Haddadi standing at 2.18m (7’2”).

For comparison on the infographic the players stand by a backstop unit. The official distance from the basket ring to the ground is 3.05m (10’0”).

The (mean) average height of all the participants is 1.99m (6’5”).

It could be interesting to compare (link opens to a new window) the height of the participants of the FIBA basketball World Cup to the height of the participants of the equivalent 2014 FIFA World Cup (football). The average height of the 2014 Brazil World Cup footballers was 1.82m (5’11”).

Here is a table with the heights of each position and team (average) participating in the 2014 FIBA Basketball World Cup:

Height of:
(cm)
(ft)
Hamed Haddadi (Iran – center) 218.0 7’2”
Centers (average) 209.9 6’9”
Power Forwards (average) 204.9 6’7”
Greece 204.0 6’7”
Serbia 203.9 6’7”
Croatia 202.7 6’6”
Lithuania 202.3 6’6”
All forwards (average) 202.2 6’6”
Senegal 201.6 6’6”
Australia 201.4 6’6”
France 200.9 6’6”
Turkey 200.8 6’6”
USA 200.8 6’6”
Brazil 200.1 6’6”
Ukraine 200.1 6’6”
Slovenia 199.8 6’6”
Spain 199.8 6’6”
Small Forwards (average) 199.4 6’5”
All Players (average) 199.1 6’5”
Finland 198.6 6’5”
Argentina 198.4 6’5”
Puerto Rico 198.3 6’5”
Iran 198.3 6’5”
Mexico 197.0 6’5”
Egypt 196.4 6’4”
Angola 196.1 6’4”
New Zealand 195.9 6’4”
Dominican Republic 194.8 6’4”
Korea 194.3 6’4”
Shooting Guards (average) 193.7 6’4”
Philippines 191.3 6’3”
All guards (average) 190.3 6’2”
Point Guards (average) 187.8 6’2”
Lewis Alfred ‘LA’ Tenorio (Philippines – Guard) 170.0 5’6”

Sources:
FIBA The Official Website of the 2014 FIBA Basketball World Cup

If you found this post interesting, why not have a look at other of our posts/infographics related to sports:
A history of the Basketball World Championships (Mundobasket) [1950-2006]
The History of the Football World Cup Finals (1930-2006) infographic
2014 FIFA World Cup™: The Players series – I. Where their club is based (home/abroad & top countries) infographic
Bigger, thicker, heavier: the evolution of the Olympic Games medals infographic

 

2014 FIFA World Cup™: The Vicious Circle of Penalty Shootouts [infographic]

12 July, 2014
Infographic presenting how teams proceed when they play consecutive penalty shootouts

Click on the image to enlarge it

Here is an interesting pattern / sequence we have noticed at the knockout stage of the 2014 World Cup:

  • During the ‘Round of 16’ Costa Rica beats Greece in penalty shootout 5 – 3 (Full-time Score: 1-1)
  • Costa Rica plays against Netherlands on the next round (quarter-finals); the game ends with a penalty shootout in which Costa Rica looses 4-3 (Full-time score: 0-0)
  • Netherlands then plays against Argentina (semi-finals) and looses 4-2 (Full-time score: 0-0)

If the pattern continues Argentina will be in trouble if the final match against Germany ends in a penalty shootout.

Is it because the opposition have the opportunity to study the way the team, which has advanced to the current stage from a penalty shootout match, handles the penalties (the goalkeeper and the players who take them)? Or is it something random? If the final (Germany vs Argentina) ends in a penalty shootout we will have the opportunity to get a better idea.

Sources:
BBC World Cup 2014 | Groups & Schedule | Knockout Stage

If you found this post interesting, why not have a look at our posts about:
2014 FIFA World Cup™: The Players series – II. Their height (tallest & shortest: player, team, position) infographic
2014 FIFA World Cup™: The Players series – I. Where their club is based (home/abroad & top countries) infographic
The History of the Football World Cup Finals (1930-2006) infographic
World Cup Finals 2010: the Group Stage – an infograph
World Cup 2010: Representation of the Continents (infographic)

 

2014 FIFA World Cup™: The Players series – II. Their height (tallest & shortest: player, team, position) infographic

24 June, 2014
Infographic with facts and figures about the players of the 2014 FIFA World Cup™

Click on the image to enlarge it

This is the second infographic of a series related to the players of the 2014 World Cup. It examines the height of the footballers.

Tallest man of the tournament is England’s goalkeeper Fraser Forster with a height of 2.01 metres (6’7”). The shortest goalkeepers have a height of 1.78m (5’10”) and there are five of them: Cameroon’s Loic Feudjou & Sammy Ndjock, Costa Rica’s Patrick Pemberton, Honduras’s Noel Valladares and Mexico’s Jose Corona. On average goalkeepers are taller than the rest of the players (1.88m).

They are followed by defenders (1.83m) and forwards (1.80m). Shortest position is the midfielders (1.79m). The shortest two men of this World Cup are Cameroon’s midfielder Edgar Salli and Italy’s forward Lorenzo Insigne (both 1.63m – 5’4”)*.

Tallest team on average is Germany (1.85m) followed by Bosnia & Herzegovina and Greece. Shortest team is Chile (1.76m) followed by Japan and Mexico (1.78m).

For comparison on the infographic the players stand by a goalpost. The official distance from the lower edge of the crossbar to the ground is 2.44m (8ft).

Here is a table with the heights of each team (average) participating in the World Cup:

Height of:
(cm)
(ft)
Fraser Forster (England – goalkeeper) 201.0 6’7”
Goalkeepers (average) 187.7 6’2”
Germany 185.3 6’2”
Bosnia and Herzegovina 185.0 6’2”
Greece 184.7 6’2”
Belgium 184.5 6’2”
Croatia 184.4 6’2”
Korea Republic (South Korea) 183.9 6’0”
England 183.3 6’0”
Iran 183.1 6’0”
USA 183.0 6’0”
Defenders (average) 183.0 6’0”
Switzerland 182.8 6’0”
Italy 182.4 6’0′
Algeria 182.2 6’0”
Brazil 182.0 6’0”
Nigeria 182.0 6’0”
Netherlands 181.9 6’0”
Russia 181.9 6’0”
Portugal 181.8 6’0”
Colombia 181.7 6’0”
All Players (average) 181.6 5’11”
France 181.3 5’11”
Uruguay 181.2 5’11”
Argentina 181.1 5’11”
Côte d’Ivoire (Ivory Coast) 180.8 5’11”
Australia 180.3 5’11”
Costa Rica 180.3 5’11”
Forwards (average) 180.2 5’11”
Spain 179.8 5’11”
Honduras 179.6 5’11”
Cameroon 179.4 5’11”
Ghana 179.4 5’11”
Ecuador 179.3 5’11”
Midfielders (average) 178.7 5’10”
Japan 178.0 5’10”
Mexico 178.0 5’10”
Chile 176.0 5’9”
Edgar Salli (Cameroon – Midfielder)
Lorenzo Insigne (Italy – Forward)
163.0 5’4”

 

Sources:
FIFA The Official Website of the FIFA World Cup™

If you found this post interesting, why not have a look at our posts about:
2014 FIFA World Cup™: The Players series – I. Where their club is based (home/abroad & top countries) infographic
The History of the Football World Cup Finals (1930-2006) infographic
World Cup Finals 2010: the Group Stage – an infograph
World Cup 2010: Representation of the Continents (infographic)

 

* In previous versions of the infographic (1.0-1.0.1 – 24 June 2014) & post, it was stated that the shortest man of the tournament was Marvin Chavez (Honduras – Midfielder) with a height of 1.56m; this was most likely because of a typo at FIFA’s database/website. After cross-referencing with other sources (e.g. The Guardian) it looks as if Marvin Chavez is not 1.56m high but 1.65m instead.
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